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FY12-13 Impacts and Accomplishments – MANAGEMENT
 
Impacts and Accomplishments – MANAGEMENT

RESEARCH   MANAGEMENT   OUTREACH   EXTENSION

FOCUS AREA: Coastal and Ocean Landscape, others as secondary

Goal:
Widespread use of ecosystem-based approaches to managing land, water, and living resources in coastal areas; Healthy coastal economies that include working waterfronts, abundant recreation and tourism opportunities, and coastal access; A healthy domestic seafood industry that harvests, produces, processes, and markets seafood responsibly and efficiently; Sufficient community capacity to prepare for, adapt to, mitigate, and recover from hazardous events; Coastal and ocean education programs foster scientific literacy, stewardship, and a scientifically trained workforce
Partners: Governors’ South Atlantic Alliance
Title: Governors’ South Atlantic Alliance: Building a regional ocean partnership framework for the coastal ocean of the southeastern United States
PI: DeVoe, SCSGC
Project Number: P/M-1

RELEVANCE:  The coastal ocean region off of South Carolina and the southeast United States is becoming the focus of interest by both public and private sectors and the resource management community given its potential for economic gains from offshore oil and gas development, alternative energy (especially wind) development, the mining of sand for beach nourishment, marine protected areas for sustainable fisheries, and ocean recreation and tourism. At the same time, military and maritime commerce interests maintain a significant presence in the region and their interests must be addressed.  These pressures cut across state boundaries, and involve significant state, federal, NGO, and private sector roles.

RESPONSE:  The S.C. Sea Grant Consortium has been actively involved with the Governors’ South Atlantic Alliance (www.southatlanticalliance.org), formally established by the Governors of FL, GA, S.C., and N.C. on October 19, 2009 at an official ceremony in Charleston, S.C. The Consortium Executive Director (DeVoe) is a member of the GSAA Executive Planning Team’s Leadership Group which is coordinating regional alliance activities. In addition, the Consortium was selected by the GSAA in 2010 to temporarily serve as the Alliance’s administrative and fiscal agent. In addition, the Consortium’s Coastal Communities Development Extension Specialist is serving in a leadership role on the Alliance’s Working Waterfronts Issue Area Technical Team (IATT), one of four IATTs established by Alliance leadership.

RESULTS:  In January 2012, the Consortium and the GSAA were informed by NOAA that funding of Phase I efforts to develop the alliance and to initiate coastal and ocean planning efforts was approved, and in June 2012, the Consortium, on behalf of the Alliance, hired a full-time Alliance Regional Coordinator. The Consortium currently manages more than$1.2 million in grants to the GSAA and developed, maintains, and hosts the GSAA’s Web site.  Together, the Alliance team has initiated a number of activities outlined in the Alliance’s Action and Implementation Plans (www.southatlanticalliance.org/priorities/action-plan.htm). To continue the work of the Alliance, a second set of proposals was submitted to NOAA for Phase II support, and the Consortium was notified in the Fall of 2012 that an additional $278,000 was awarded to the Alliance.

RECAP:  The Consortium, acting as the Governors’ South Atlantic Alliance administrative and communications agent, has secured Phase II funding to continue to support regional initiatives identified by the four southeastern states and federal and public and private sector partners to benefit coastal ocean planning and management.

FOCUS AREA: Sustainable Coastal Development and Economy
Goal:
Coastal citizens, community leaders, and industries recognize the complex inter-relationships among the social, economic, and environmental values in coastal areas, and work together to balance multiple uses and optimize environmental sustainability.
Partners: GSAA, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, NOAA Coastal Services Center, South
Carolina DHEC OCRM, Florida Division of Emergency Management, NOAA National Weather Service, North Carolina Division of Coastal Management
Title: Long-Term Recovery Planning Summit Convened by the Governors’ South Atlantic Alliance
PI: DeVoe, SCSGC
Project Number:  P/M-1

RELEVANCE:  The coastal ocean region off of South Carolina and the southeast United States is becoming the focus of interest by both public and private sectors and the resource management community given its potential for economic gains from offshore oil and gas development, alternative energy (especially wind) development, the mining of sand for beach nourishment, presence of marine protected areas for sustainable fisheries, and economic impact of ocean recreation and tourism. One of the factors that greatly influences decision-making on the future of these economic activities is the frequency with which the region is subjected to natural hazards like hurricanes, coastal storms, storm surge, and flooding that can devastate communities and disrupt businesses. Most current methods for handling the impacts of these hazards is reactive, which has has limited success on the long term health of the communities that were impacted. A greater focus on pre-event planning to ensure long-term recovery is needed. 

RESPONSE:  The Governors’ South Atlantic Alliance Disaster-Resilient Communities Issue Area Technical Team hosted a Long-Term Recovery Planning Summit in Jacksonville, FL, on July 10-11, 2012.  Federal, state and local governments, non-profit organizations, researchers, and private industries that address hazard resiliency and recovery issues in the South Atlantic region met to discuss some of the most relevant topics in this field and to share experiences and success stories that participants could use in their own jurisdictions. The major focus was to address failings of the current system that focuses on short-term recovery, that allows for the population to return within 1-2 years of a major event, but may not account for the businesses that are never able to recover. The loss of these businesses effects the local economy and availability of jobs leading to billions of dollars in short-term recovery funds supporting communities that essentially go defunct within a decade.

RESULTS:  The meeting actively trained participants in how to  address not only short-term response to an hazard, but also in planning ahead to address long-term, recovery-planning issues from the national level (e.g., implementation of the National Disaster Recovery Framework), the state level (e.g., Florida’s Post-Disaster Redevelopment Planning Initiative), and the local level. Successful frameworks implemented in impacted areas that resulted in long-term community recovery were explored, allowing participants  to examine the opportunities that public-private partnerships and the role of non-profit organizations can have in long-term disaster recovery for the whole community. The meeting summary is available online at http://www.southatlanticalliance.org/events/archives-2012-recovery-summit.htm.

RECAP:  The Governors’ South Atlantic Alliance Disaster Resilient Communities Issue Area Technical Team, lead by S.C. Sea Grant’s director, organized and convened a Long-Term Recovery Planning Summit for state and local officials to share experiences and success stories with other jurisdictions on how to develop and implement long-term recovery planning and avoid the pitfalls of short-term recovery that does not meet needs of the community beyond 5 years after a major event.

FOCUS AREA: Scientific Literacy and Workforce Development
Goal(s):
Coastal and ocean education programs foster scientific literacy, stewardship, and a scientifically trained workforce
Title: Two South Carolina Students Selected for Knauss Fellowships
PI: DeVoe, SCSGC
Project Numbers: E/F-50 and E/F-51
Partners: NSGO

RELEVANCE:  The National Sea Grant College Program’s Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship, established in 1979, provides a unique educational experience to students who have an interest in ocean, coastal and Great Lakes resources and in the national policy decisions affecting those resources. The program matches highly qualified graduate students with hosts in the legislative and executive branches of government located in the Washington, D.C. area for a one-year paid fellowship. The students learn about federal policy regarding marine and Great Lakes natural resources and lend their scientific expertise to federal agencies and congressional staff offices. 

RESPONSE:  The S.C. Sea Grant Consortium received six formal applications for the Knauss fellowship program this year. After interviewing the six applicants, the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium submitted three application packages to the National Sea Grant Office for consideration by the Knauss Fellowship review panel.
 
RESULTS:  Two of the Consortium’s three fellowship candidates were selected as Knauss executive fellows in the 2012 class, both graduate students from the College of Charleston. These students were among 42 selected from a nationwide pool of over 100 candidates. The Consortium’s Knauss fellows are Ms. Jennifer Bennett, who completed a M.S. in marine biology, and served in the NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Ocean Acidification Program, and Ms. Anna Manyak who also completed a M.S. in marine biology, and served in the NOAA National Ocean Service Office of Response and Restoration.

RECAP:  The Consortium interviewed six candidates for the National Sea Grant College Program’s Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship, submitted three candidates to the National Sea Grant Office for consideration, and had two of the three selected to serve as Kanuss fellows.

FOCUS AREA: Scientific Literacy and Workforce Development
Goal:
Coastal and ocean education programs foster scientific literacy, stewardship, and a scientifically trained workforce.
Title: South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium Helps Foster Graduate Education in the Ocean Sciences
Partners: College of Charleston Graduate Program in Marine Biology; The Graduate School at the College of Charleston
PI: DeVoe, SCSGC
Project ID: P/M-1

RELEVANCE:  The education and training of graduate students is one of the Consortium’s primary objectives in its Ocean Literacy and Workforce Development portfolio. One way it accomplishes this is through Consortium staff leadership and formal engagement with a variety of organizations and institutions in the state.  Consortium staff have been active in such efforts, and have been recognized for the significant contributions they make. The Consortium Executive Director’s efforts in this arena focus on service to the Consortium’s academic institutions; this is but one way that these efforts are manifest.

RESPONSE:  Over the last year, the Consortium Executive Director was elected by the marine biology faculty to serve on the Marine Biology Council for the Graduate Program in Marine Biology at the College of Charleston (Charleston, SC), and more recently was asked and agreed to serve on its Graduate School Advisory Board by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

RESULTS:  The Marine Biology Council is the overarching body that addresses graduate student and faculty issues and needs of the College of Charleston’s Marine Biology Program, thus attempting to provide the best environment for student learning and fostering student achievement. The Graduate School Advisory Board has been established to assist the College of Charleston leadership as it seeks to significantly expand its graduate school offerings, including those in marine sciences and policy, over the next five years.  

RECAP:  Consortium staff continue to support the nurturing of graduate student education in many ways, including serving in key leadership roles at Consortium member institutions.

FOCUS AREA:  Coastal and Ocean Landscape
Goal(s):
Sound scientific information available to support ecosystem-based approaches to managing the coastal environment
Title: Building the Regional Network: The National Federation of Regional Associations for Coastal and Ocean Observing Contribution
PI: Quintrell, E/IOOS-1; E/IOOS-2
Partners: Alaska Ocean Observing System; Caribbean Regional Association; Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System; Great Lakes Observing System; Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System; Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System; Mid-Atlantic Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing Systems; Northeastern Regional Association of Coastal and Ocean Observing Systems; Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems; Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System; Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association, IOOS Program Office

RELEVANCE:  The Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) is a national-regional partnership working to provide new tools and forecasts to improve safety, enhance the economy, and protect the ocean environment. Integrated ocean information is now available in near real-time, as well as retrospectively. Easier and more rapid access to this information is improving our ability to understand and predict coastal events - such as storms, wave heights, and sea level change. Such knowledge can result in beneficial impacts, such as improved search and rescue success, cost avoidance during hazards such as oil spills, and enhanced water quality monitoring.

RESPONSE:  With facilitation from the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, the IOOS Association (formerly the National Federation of Regional Associations of Coastal and Ocean Observing, or NFRA) received funding from NOAA to support the national Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) network through enhanced communication and coordination of the 11 IOOS Regional Associations (RAs) and the coordination of Annual Regional Coordination Workshops.  NFRA fosters communication among the RAs and the IOOS Federal agencies through meetings, conference calls, websites, newsletters and other venues.

RESULTS:  The IOOS Association develops Regional Associations to deliver scientific data and information on the nation’s oceans; promotes the integration and coordination the regional systems into an integrated national system to enhance observational and predictive abilities in ocean science; develops regional programs through capacity building, exchange of technical information, and sharing of facilities and infrastructure; and, educates the public about ocean observing and its importance to the nation.

RECAP:  With S.C. Sea Grant Consortium assistance, the IOOS Association continues to facilitate development of the IOOS regional associations both regionally and nationally. Related activities contribute to enhanced search and rescue efforts, improved hazard forecasting, and more accurate predictions of threats to human health.

FOCUS AREA: Scientific Literacy and Workforce Development
Goal:
Coastal and ocean education programs foster scientific literacy, stewardship, and a scientifically trained workforce.
Title: South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium Executive Director Recognized by NOSB Organizers
Partners: National Ocean Science Bowl, Consortium for Ocean Leadership
PI: DeVoe, P/M-1

RELEVANCE:  The Consortium for Ocean Leadership, representing leading oceanographic institutions universities and aquaria, manages a national academic competition for high schools on topics related to the study of the oceans — the National Ocean Sciences Bowl® (NOSB). The NOSB is a nationally recognized and highly acclaimed high school academic competition that provides a forum for talented students to test their knowledge of the marine sciences including biology, chemistry, physics, and geology. The NOSB was created in 1998 in honor of the International Year of the Ocean and since its inception, the competition has grown to include 25 regional competition locations with 300 schools and over 2,000 students participating annually. The NOSB mission is to enrich science teaching and learning across the United States through a high-profile national competition that increases high school students’ knowledge of the oceans and enhances public understanding and stewardship of the oceans.

RESPONSE:  The Consortium has been involved with the NOSB, specifically the South Carolina/Georgia Regional Competition, since NOSB was launched in 1998. It is one of the Consortium’s goals to motivate students to take an interest and seek professional careers in ocean sciences, and the NOSB provides a very visible avenue for cultivating this interest. This is the primary reason that the Consortium’s Executive Director agreed to serve as the lead moderator for the South Carolina/Georgia Regional NOSB Competition in 2002, which he has done since then.

RESULTS:  The Consortium on Ocean Leadership recently recognized the Consortium Executive Director for his 15 years of service and commitment to the NOSB.

RECAP:  The Consortium has supported the South Carolina/Georgia National Ocean Science Bowl competition since the inception of the NOSB in 1998, and its Executive Director was recently recognized for his contributions to that competition and the NOSB by the Consortium on Ocean Leadership.


Last updated: 6/24/2013 8:42:05 AM
FY12-13 Impacts and Accomplishments – MANAGEMENT

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